January 2016

Panorama of Monoceros

Panorama of Monoceros in NarrowbandThis is a ten panel mosaic depicting Caldwell 49 up to and including the Cone Nebula and Christmas Tree Cluster. It has been around two months in the making.

maging telescope or lens: Vixen VSD
Imaging camera: Starlight Express SXVR-H18
Mount: Sky-Watcher NEQ6 Pro
Guiding telescope or lens: Vixen VSD
Software: Sequence Generator Pro
Filter: Baader H-alpha 3.5 Nm
Accessory: Starlight Xpress Lodestar Guider
Resolution: 4000×2235
Dates: Jan. 26, 2016
Locations: Home observatory, Valencia, Spain

Monoceros is a faint constellation on the celestial equator. Its name is Greek for unicorn. Its definition is attributed to the 17th-century Dutch cartographer Petrus Plancius.

Monoceros is home to The Rosette Nebula , the Christmas Tree Cluster and the Cone Nebula.

The Rosette Nebula (NGC 2237, 2238, 2239, and 2246) is a diffuse nebula in Monoceros. It has an overall magnitude of 6.0 and is 4900 light-years from Earth. The Rosette Nebula, over 100 light-years in diameter, has an associated star cluster and possesses many Bok globules in its dark areas. It was independently discovered in the 1880s by Lewis Swift (early 1880s) and Edward Emerson Barnard (1883) as they hunted for comets.
The Christmas Tree Cluster (NGC 2264) is another open cluster in Monoceros. Named for its resemblance to a Christmas tree, it is fairly bright at an overall magnitude of 3.9; it is 2400 light-years from Earth. The variable star S Monocerotis represents the tree’s trunk, while the variable star V429 Monocerotis represents its top.[3]
The Cone Nebula (NGC 2264), associated with the Christmas Tree Cluster, is a very dim nebula that contains a dark conic structure. It appears clearly in photographs, but is very elusive in a telescope. The nebula contains several Herbig-Haro objects, which are small irregularly variable nebulae. They are associated with protostars.

 

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A Panorama of Monoceros in Ha

PUBLISHEDA Panorama of Monoceros in Ha
This is a ten panel mosaic depicting Caldwell 49 up to and including the Cone Nebula and Christmas Tree Cluster. It has been around two months in the making. Next I will be looking to acquire the OIII data needed to complete this project in colour. Hope you find it interesting and thank you for looking!

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Rosette nebula – full throttle!

Rosette NebulaNew project under construction: Part two of 10 (see below : panels 5 and 6) This will eventual include Caldwell 49 up to and including the Cone Nebula and Christmas Tree Cluster.
Frames: 78×1800″
Integration: 39.0 hours

Imaging telescope or lens: Vixen VSD
Imaging camera: Starlight Express SXVR-H18
Mount: Software Bisque Paramount MX
Guiding telescope or lens: Vixen VSD
Software: Sequence Generator Pro
Filter: Baader Ha, Hb, OIII & SII
Accessory: Starlight Xpress Lodestar Guider

 

Layout with SGP

This is the layout of my current project. A panorama of Caldwell 49 up to and including the Cone Nebula and Christmas Tree Cluster. Sequence Generator Pro’s mosaic wizard helps a lot when it comes to planing and composing multi panel work.  It makes for an easy life and lets one concentrate on the creative stuff like framing.

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NGC7380 The Wizard nebula

NGC7380 The Wizard nebula in its natural cloud of interstellar gas and dust. I have had this one on the back burner for some time as a fill in project while waiting for the main target to rise into position. I have tried to capture the Wizard in its faint nebular surroundings . Hope you find it interesting.
Integration: about 40 hours Narrowband.

NGC 7380 (also known as the Wizard Nebula) is an open cluster discovered by Caroline Herschel .

NGC7380 The Wizard nebula

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The sands of time and space.

This a mosaic of the nebula structures in constellation Auriga. This image is made up of 6 panels with an integration of around 95 hours of exposure. This spans about 6 degrees across.

Caldwell 31, a huge, sprawling nebula spanning five light years and surrounding the ‘Flaming Star’, AE Aurigae, the bright star visible in the upper portion of the nebula. AE Aur (mag. +6) is an runaway star that is thought to have been one of three stars ejected from near the Trapezium in Orion 2.7 million years ago. It’s a class-O hydrogen fusing dwarf that is at least 30,000 times more luminous than our Sun. The nebula and the star lie around 1500 light years away.

The smaller nebula at the top is IC405, commonly known as the Tadpole Nebula for the small ‘tadpole-like’ structures of dense, cooler gas that are being shaped by the intense radiation from the hot stars of the young open cluster NGC 1893, embedded in the nebulosity. It’s just possible to see the tadpoles to the upper right of the largest dark section at the centre of the nebulosity, with the open cluster just above. IC405 lies 12,000 light years away.
This spans about 6 degrees across. (RA, Dec) center: (79.8949393456, 33.848383173) degrees
Orientation: 1.66970120494 deg E of N
Pixel scale of each panel: 2.93452415637 arcsec/pixel Imaging telescopes or lenses: Vixen VSD and Takahashi TSA 102
Imaging cameras: Starlight Express SXVR-H18
Mounts: Sky-Watcher MX
Guiding telescopes or lenses:Vixen VSD
Guiding cameras: sx loadstar
Software: Sequence Generator Pro, PHD, Photoshop CS5
Filters: Baader Ha, OIII & SII
Accessories: Starlight Xpress USB filter wheel, Baader Planetarium 36mm narrowband filters Processed in PI and PS Mosaic merge using Gradient Merge Mosaic tool in PI

The sands of time and space.

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